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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 300-303

Oral lichen planus and its association with diabetes mellitus and hypertension


1 Professor, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India
2 Ex-Professor and Head, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Anjana Bagewadi
Professor, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences Belgaum-590010, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10011-1154

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In 1963, Grinspan found an interesting association of oral lichen planus with diabetes mellitus and hypertension, which he called as Grinspan syndrome. Various studies carried later had ambigous findings. Oral lichen planus is a common condition, recognized over hundred years from now, with an unclear etiopathogenesis. But, it is premalignant in nature and needs attention at earliest. Thus, a study was conducted to assess the association of oral lichen planus, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study comprised of 150 subjects divided in three groups. Group I comprising of 50 confirmed cases of oral lichen planus. Group II comprising of diabetic patient. Group III comprising of hypertensive patient. The objectives were (a) to assess blood sugar level and blood pressure in (50) oral lichen planus, (b) examine (50) diabetic patients for oral lichen planus and hypertension, (c) examine (50) hypertensive patients for oral lichen planus and (d) assess for any correlation among all three conditions (oral lichen planus with diabetes mellitus and hypertension). Thorough examination of group I for diabetes and hypertension, group II for oral lichen planus and hypertension and group III for oral lichen planus and diabetes was done. The results were analyzed using Chi-square test for correlation. The study showed that presence of only four diabetic patients and eight hypertensive patients among 50 oral lichen planus patients. Only one patient had all the three findings which were statistically insignificant. No oral lichen planus was observed in diabetic or hypertensive cases. Thus, it is conclusive that diabetes mellitus and hypertension do not play a direct role in the etiology of lichen planus. It could be lichenoid lesions due to the type of the drug and its duration.


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